Carmen Marc Valvo Fall 2006 - Fairytale Collection

February 8, 2006

All over the globe men question it; Mel Gibson made a movie to ponder it, what do women really want?  On Feb. 8, in the Tent of Olympus Fashion Week, onlookers to the Carmen Marc Valvo show were enlightened.  It's no mystery really.  Women want simplistic glamour, deep mystique, stand alone beauty, vivid desire and the allure of richness.  They want Carmen Marc Valvo and he managed to wrap himself into each of the 41 looks that appeared at his Fall 2006 show.  The gowns were everything we had hoped for.  Impeccably crafted, appearing as if it could carry your life story within its threads.

Valvo first began his career working with Nina Ricci, as a ready-to-wear designer before joining the Christian Dior team for a short time.  In 1989, Valvo started his own collection, giving all of us ladies exactly what we were looking for, wearable glamour that transforms us into sparkling sweethearts.  He presents his couture collection each year at fashion week and this year was no exception.

In the dim blue light of the Tent, only Valvo's name in white, against the dark black background stood out, until the models, straight haired and sleek, emerged. 

Valvo found inspiration in the oil paintings of Helmut Ditsch, an Argentinean born painter.  He relied on the strokes of deep midnight and soft icy blues, midnight blacks and pure whites, of Ditsh's Arctic paintings to form the palette for his collection.

One after the other, extravagant examples of eveningwear, floated across the runway.  The dresses all possessed a unique motif, such as ruffles, lace detailing or sparkly embellishment.  In a perfect story of happily ever after, these gowns would walk right off the pages and into our closets.  They are the type of dress we never forget, and everyone who sees us in it, never forgets it either.  They are fairytale dresses that only come to us in our dreams.  This year, Valvo has brought our deepest dreams into existence.

          

Valvo utilized silk, along with rouching, to accentuate a flirty attitude into some of the dresses.  For more serious occasions he called upon his love for intricate detailing to create subtle patterns and lines for a more lavishing gown. 

       

                             

This was my absolute favorite look of the show.  The weaving of ribbons in and out of the material made it standout against the other designs.  It was feminine and chique and glowed of pure beauty.  It inspired me to indulge myself, to spoil myself with a gift or expensive dinner.  It empowered me, and with intent stares and jotting of notes, I believe every other woman in the room felt the same way.

      

            

Valvo always brings a sense of reality into to his line.  This season he didn't disappoint.  Understanding each day isn't red carpet worthy, he included some pantsuits, albeit incredibly beautiful, into the show.

With the Arctic in mind, Valvo worked to create the feeling of being cold.  Some models even wore gloves to help showcase the inspiration.  However, he warmed the chilly air with some beautiful coats for this upcoming fall season.

Whether it was light blue tinted sunglasses, soft scarves, fur wraps, or fur boleros, Valvo accessorized some life into certain designs.  The light details added embellishment in just the right places.

Valvo has always been known for his raw talent in crafting unparalleled garments of undefined elegance.  His unique detail and eye to keep comfort in fashion have always left women feeling as if the gowns were created just for them.  In a sense, they were.  Valvo always creates for women, never leaving us displeased.  That type of artistic understanding calls for a celebration, in a Carmen Marc Valvo gown of course.

Always made for a fairytale, always made for what women really want. 

Photos courtesy of:  nymag.com

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