Matter of Trust, Raecyclements and Smart Glass Review - Recycling at a New Level

After a long day at work standing on his tired feet working on styling, cutting and blow drying hair at his salon in Mobile, Alabama. Phil McCory went home to finally relax, have dinner and watch the news. While watching the CNN coverage on the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, which was considered one of the most devastating man-made environmental disaster ever at sea, he became aware of something.  “I noticed the fur on the Alaskan otters completely soaked with oil,” McCory said. “I began testing how much oil I could collect with the hair clippings from my salon.”

Matter of Trust - Saving Mother Earth


Matter of Trust - Saving Mother Earth


He put hair clippings in a nylon stocking and found that this would soak up oil spills. McCory then invented the hairmat to clean up oil spills and is now a part of Matter of Trust Organization which began in 2000.
Today, McCrory collects hair from salons all around the country. He has children and teachers,  barbers, and pet owners sending all types of hair of all colors and styles--dyed, permed, straightened, and curly. He even welcomes fur, feathers and horse hair as a way to clean up Mother Nature.

Matter of Trust - Saving Mother Earth


Matter of Trust - Saving Mother Earth


Millions of Americans are recycling. But recycling is not just about separating paper, plastic and glass for the recycling truck that comes once a week. There are many other ways people recycle: grass and leaves, rubber, composting, computers are just to name a few, but people like McCory are discovering how to make trash into something worthwhile that people love.
In a press release on December 19, 2008, McCory stated, “The amazing support and media excitement for this project has been inspiring.”

Rejuviebagz - Eco Friendly Bags


Orange County, Rebecca Molina appreciates the garbage in the Philippines, in particular, thousands of juice packs and rice sacks are reused for something extremely functional. “I feel very strongly about reducing waste. It will lead to a cleaner environment,” said Molina.

Rejuviebagz - Eco Friendly Bags


Molina founded Raecyclements two years ago and designs Rejuviebagz. They are handbags and accessories handmade in the Phillipines from Recycled rice sacks and recycled juice packs. The recycled supplies are gathered in the Philippines by women cooperative. Juice packs are recycled in bins and provided everywhere. At the end of the day, it’s  picked up and sent to another group that will wash and sanitize the juice packs.

Rejuviebagz - Eco Friendly Bags


A portion of the supplies from juice packs are provided by the juice manufacturer itself.  They are factory rejects or cut from rolls of packaging that have been slashed and ready to be burned. The cooperative organized a regular collection of these juice packs factory rejects.

Supplies from the rice sacks are from the rice dealers that has used them once or twice in rice packaging.  “They are so colorful and just gathering dust in the warehouse so Raecyclements have contracted the dealer to sell the empty packages of rice bags at negotiated rate.” Said Molina.

Rejuviebagz - Eco Friendly Bags


Rejuviebagz, handbags are made from intricately woven patterns and each bag is created one at a time taking up to a whole day to create. Since all Raecyclements’ juice bags products are handmade, not one piece is the same, making each bag one-of-a-kind.

Sharon Soboil from Los Angeles got a one-of-a-kind Rejuviebag as a gift from her husband. “I love Rejuviebagz - at least 10 people a day ask me about my handbag,” said Soboil.

Molina has been in business for almost two years.  Her handbags and accessories are sold in high and middle end boutique, museum gift shops and eco-friendly stores. Women of all ages are using her products especially the eco-conscious. community.  Martha Thang from Los Angeles said “I think her stuff is fabulous—what a great way to recycle.”

www.raecyclements.com

Another creative artist who began using recycled bottles is Kathleen Plate from Atlanta, Georgia, owner and founder of Smart Glass Recycled Jewelry while she was holding a hair product glass bottle she discovered how beautiful the glass was. She began creating her glass jewelry part time because of her past experience with her mother. But soon her jewelry was in demand before her business started. “I've always had a huge demand and tried to fill it the best I could - so lucky!”

Smart Glass Handmade Recycled Jewelry


So Plate put her graduate work in American literature on hold to leap into launching her jewelry line. And her luck kept following her when she received a call, out-of-the-blue, from Coca-Cola. They had seen her jewelry and wanted her to make jewelry out their bottles. They now send her reject bottles and the artists creates the famous glass bottles into chic jewelry.

Smart Glass Handmade Recycled Jewelry


Smart Glass Recycled Jewelry is handmade in Atlanta, Georgia from glass, sterling silver, and silver solder using traditional stained glass methods. Each piece is individually selected, with variations in shape and texture in the glass ensuring that every piece in the Smart Glass line is a truly unique and a one-of-a-kind original.

Smart Glass Handmade Recycled Jewelry


Plate’s line consist of necklaces, earrings, bracelets, cocktail, ornaments, drawer pulls, fan pulls, men’s necklace, They come in all different sizes and colors and make a fashionable statement.

Smart Glass Handmade Recycled Jewelry


Adriana Davalos from Los Angeles wears her necklace and earrings. “I think it’s awesome! It’s amazing that something, that would otherwise be junk, is now a beautiful piece of jewelry that I continuously get compliments on and they feel so natural to wear.” Said Davalos.

Smart Glass Handmade Recycled Jewelry


Plates’ jewelry takes time and precision. Just cutting and firing the bottles is a 10 hour process to create a necklace. Then the glass must slowly cool down. Once the rings are done, then she designs up from there.
Smart Glass just developed a line of rings and cufflinks that uses the bottom of the bottles. “I've been saving those bottle bottoms all year knowing we would use them somehow.” Said Plate.

Plate has also been known to leave a restaurant with a bottle or two in her purse. She said some restaurants save bottles for her and her studio looks like a liquor store explosion.

Plate makes every single piece of jewelry by hand. “I feel like the luckiest person in the world to have a job I love and create something that is beautiful and eco-friendly.” Said Plate. “I love the surprise in people's faces when they realize their cool necklace is made from a beer bottle.”

www.smartglassjewelry.com

The environment doesn’t care whether you recycle in the West Coast or in the Far East, it still is helping to keep our planet healthy. You don’t have to recycle things into art. Recycling newspaper can make a great impact on our environment. For example, according to http://greenliving.lovetoknow.com

“Around one-third of all household waste is paper. It is reported that a staggering 14 percent of landfill space is taken up by newspaper alone. Keeping paper out of landfill sites is the most important reason why paper is recycled. Reducing the amount of paper going into landfills, therefore, slows down the pace that landfill sites are filling.

Another benefit of keeping paper out of landfills is that decomposing paper releases methane gas, which is a potent greenhouse gas (20 times more potent than carbon dioxide). It is becoming increasingly more widely accepted that reducing greenhouse gases will help to slow down global warming. Therefore recycling paper has a wider global environmental benefit.

The recycling of paper products can have a major effect on the number of trees that have to be cut each year. A county environment services department in New York projects a huge savings in the number of trees that would not need to be cut down if newspapers and junk mail were recycled: Over 40,000 trees could be saved if all morning newspapers in the United States were recycled for one day. Up to 150,000 trees could be saved if as few as 100,000 people put themselves on a Do Not Mail list to stop receiving junk mail.”

Molina is doing more than her part. Because of her products, Raecyclements recycles an average of 3,000 rice sacks to 5,000 a month and juice packs is approximately 5,000 to 10,000 a month.

Molina recycles at her home and thinks that it’s very important. “I feel very strongly about it. Reducing waste will lead to a cleaner environment.” Said Molina. “My late husband Ray Molina, who passed away last year, motivated me to do business that will protect our environment.  We both felt that was the reason why he got sick -- because of too much pollution.  It affects the air that we breathe and the food that we consume.”


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